Time to give up the scales? Why weighing yourself may be bad for your health.

Many swear by their week weigh-ins but chances are, your scales are causing you more stress than you think. Find out how to ditch the scales today!

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Following the seemingly obligatory Christmas binge, many people are working hard this January to shed the post-festive bulge. I too indulged somewhat over the holidays but I am enjoying getting back into the swing of my everyday routine.

A lot of my clients ask me what I think their ‘ideal’ weight is if and I can help them shed ‘X’ amount. Of course, I am happy and willing to support clients lose weight and tone up but I will never weigh them as part of the process nor will I encourage them to weigh themselves.

A few weeks ago, at the gym when I overheard a saddening conversation. A young girl aged around 9 of average height and build weighed herself on the communal scale and told her female caregiver her weight.

The ladies reply was along the lines of:

 ”Oh no you’ve put on weight! OK, that’s fine for now, but you have to be careful not to put on any more weight too quickly”

It disturbed me deeply that a growing girl (who was not overweight) putting on some size was a topic of discussion. I will admit I had to grit my teeth and mind my own business.

I would imagine that most women in the Western world have been concerned by the numbers displayed on a set of scales at one point or another. Most of us are able to maintain a somewhat healthy relationship with our weighing machines but for others, it can becomes a fixation with daily weigh-ins taking place.

Personally, I think that these apparatus play a very dangerous role in the lives of women often creating a yo-yo set of emotions depending on the digits displayed.

My mother didn’t keep scales in our house and so I remember my first time getting weighed quite distinctively. A doctor took my vitals and declared that I was ‘overweight’. I was flabbergasted, particularly as I was teaching four fitness classes per week and also doing my own workouts.

“Do I look overweight to you?” I asked, my temper flaring.

“Well… no” the doctor replied. “Actually you don’t, but the BMI chart says you are so I’ve got to advise you to do more exercise and to eat less”

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Me aged 20 #tbt #fashionfail

After that, I vowed never to step on a pair of scales again and I nearly succeeded until the months before my wedding when I wanted to get as fit as possible for my big day.

Continue reading “Time to give up the scales? Why weighing yourself may be bad for your health.”

Finding Your Edge

Modern life is all go go go but theres something to be said for slowing things down.

Find out how to take a step back and find your edge.

There’s a lovely term within the yoga world known as ‘finding your edge’. It encapsulates the moment where you challenge your body whilst also respecting its natural limitations.

Within the modern world, there’s a tendency to feel that more equals better and that in order to be a success we must push past our maximum. We look up to world-class athletes (and more recently insta famous fitness personalities) as an ideal of physical fitness which encourages us to push ourselves as far as we can go.

Whilst it’s fantastic to feel motivated it’s also important to proceed within your limits and to respect your body. Let’s not forget that these amazing athletes often have to retire from their chosen sport at an extremely young age (in the scheme of life). These folks have spent many years going beyond their edge in order to achieve peak performance which is completely different from achieving everyday health.

This idea of ‘finding your edge’ can be transferred from physical activity to all facets of life. As inspiring as extreme high achievers may be, I personally believe aiming for record-breaking excellence on a daily basis is not a necessity. Of course, there are times where we need to work hard and up our game but this needn’t be our default mode.

Continue reading “Finding Your Edge”